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The Blue Dog & Nitric

One became famous and revealed a lot of infamous facts. The other suffered to reveal some more  disturbing facts.

The Blue Dog of Taloja became a sensation overnight when Arati Chauhan reported an incident of dogs turning blue due to pollutants  discharged in to Kasadi River where the dogs often wade in to drink water. The episode opened a can of worms-industrial pollution going unabated in every corner of the country, while the authorities turned their gaze away, lest they have to work towards fixing the problem. Local activists requested many organisations to help ascertain the extent of damage to the dogs, if any, and when no one came forward, Thane SPCA went to Taloja, caught one of them, admitted him, ran all tests on him and released him back. It is important to mention that the colour washed off in two bathing sessions from this dog, leading us to believe that the dye was water soluble. All tests also came back clean. And Thane SPCA was visited by Jeffrey Gettleman of New York Times, visited Thane SPCA on a rainy day, to understand Mumbai’s love for its street dogs in the backdrop of the Blue Dog saga. ( https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/world/asia/mumbai-blue-dogs.html ) . It is surprising that the Blue Dogs managed to seek the attention of National Geographic also (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/08/blue-dye-dogs-india-mumbai-video-spd/)  

While the blue dogs went unaffected ( the dyes were water soluble ), and we could carry out the pathology and skin sensitivity tests on one blue dog, another dog was not such a happy protagonist. He fell into an open drain of Nitric acid, in a factory in the same area as the Blue dogs. His skin was burnt, which we could treat successfully, he also became blind in both eyes from exposure to the chemical. A story lesser known, but possibly more important, since it reveals how workers in such factories also are regularly exposed to this kind of hazard. 

We have named this dog Nitric. We have been able to restore partial vision in his left eye, but that will not be enough to release him in his original locality.

So while he is lucky that he will be adopted by a farmhouse, other such animals are not so fortunate.

Which brings us to yet another looming problem : rehabilitation for the humongous number of street animals in countries like India. There are not just enough shelters. Where do they then go????? Another dead end in our field of work.

TSPCA Hospital

N.K.T Compound, Besides
Brahmand Complex,
Azadnagar, Kolshet Road
Thane(West)
Maharashtra - 400607
Website: http://thanespca.org
Email: info@thanespca.org

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